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Comments

Mike R

Looking forward to it! I don't have a wiki login and don't see a way to get one. Is there some info on the page I'll need for tonight?

Will this link suffice?
rtsp://207.105.30.90/salon.sdp

Britney

Great webcasts look forward to mayn more!

Eric Boyd

Mark,

Thanks again for all the great future salon's - I greatly enjoy them.

Here is the link I promissed to the talk by Robin Hanson:

http://streaming.oii.ox.ac.uk:554/ramgen/archive/sbs/jmi2006/16032006-1.rm

His talk begins at the 34:00 mark.

You can see the rest of the "Better Humans?" conference here:

http://www.martininstitute.ox.ac.uk/JMI/Forum2006/Forum+2006+Webcast.htm

Once I am finished watching them all (which may take another week yet) I will be blogging about them all, but for now here's my comment on Hanson's talk:

<<
In the third talk, Robin Hanson's covers economics and uploading - and he is much less "sloppy" (his word) than other analysis's I have seen, in that he's thought through what makes a big difference (labour, human capital) and what doesn't (energy, materials). He has an interesting water/rising tide analysis which is similar to my essay on Robotics and Global Scenarios. He talks about the traditional brain-scan and simulate strategy for uploading - in general I agree that that method is the easiest way to "AI": and it has personal implications, in as much as the details of your brain WILL matter in such a scenario. Hanson has a laser-like focus on the economic implications of this kind of uploading, which is a refreshing change from the philosophic topics that most people usually address. Astonishing, really - economics doubling time at 2 weeks! His talk is probably the most interesting talk I have seen in this collection yet.
>>

He doesn't spend any time justifying his view that matter/energy are not the thing to focus on for the future, but inside his own world of economics he is probably correct: regardless of how we solve the energy problem, it's impact on the wider economy will necessairly be small. What a unique view point :-)

Eric

Shloky

I'm sure as to the nature of the webcast - if it is in fact archived or was a live only thing - but any word on if there will be a functional link sometime?

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